The Family Range
The Terroir Range

Kliprug Chenin Blanc

Back in 1982 when our winemaker Danie Jnr was two years old, this vineyard was planted on a rocky ridge — Kliprug — dotted with rough iron-rich stones. These dryland bush vines have heritage and wisdom, imparting perfect texture, balance and that magical old vine x-factor. Really, it’s a wine that makes itself. 

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Kliprug Chenin Blanc

2023

Alcohol: 13.42%
Total Acidity: 5.66.2g/ℓ
Residual Sugar: 3.8g/ℓ
pH: 3.43

Tasting Notes

Rich, deep, complex nose of bruised yellow fruits, white peach, creamy and plush, showing honeyed pineapples and leesy yellow fruits. Plenty of gravitas, fruit weight, focus and textural complexity

100% Chenin Blanc

Planted in 1982 these old bush vines now never yield more than 4 tons per hectare. Unirrigated and planted in weathered granite topsoil and crumbly clay sub-soil it’s called “Kliprug” because of all the numerous rocks on the ground.

Grapes harvested from registered heritage vineyard planted in 1982. Handpicked crushed and destemmed (with skin-contact in press). Natural sedimentation overnight after pressing (light and gentle pressing with maximum pressure of 0.8kpa). After settling, the wine is racked to 400l and 500l barrels for spontaneous fermentation. Fermentation can last between 2–4 weeks. The wine is aged in barrel for 10 months prior to bottling and bottled.

3–5 years

Neal Martin Report – 92 points

Tim Atkin – 92 points

Rich, deep, complex nose of bruised yellow fruits, white peach, creamy and plush, showing honeyed pineapples and leesy yellow fruits. Plenty of gravitas, fruit weight, focus and textural complexity

Beer battered hake tacos

Serves 4

30 Minutes

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1 cup self-rising flour, plus extra for dusting

1/2 bottle of beer

salt and pepper for seasoning

4-6 medium-sized fresh fish fillets (I use hake), scaled, cleaned and deboned

500-750ml cooking oil, for frying

wraps / tacos of your choice

kewpie mayonnaise

sriracha sauce

Asian style coleslaw

fresh limes

Heat oil (about 3-4 cm deep) in a heavy based pot on medium heat until it reaches around 160°C.

To make the batter, mix the self-rising flour with the beer and season with salt and pepper.

Take one piece of hake fillet at a time, dust lightly with self-rising flour, then dip thoroughly in batter and immediately into the heated oil. Work carefully with the oil as it will splatter. After about 2 minutes, turn the fish with a slotted spoon and fry on the other side until golden and crispy (takes about a minute). Remove from oil and drain on kitchen paper.

Toast your tacos on the fire and add toppings to your liking. Best enjoyed served immediately.

This is such a lovely meal to enjoy outside because you can eat it with your hands. There’s no need to fuss with cutlery. Surprisingly simple yet delicious.